Cybersecurity

Future Development of Quantum Computing and Its Relevance to NATO

Brandmeier, Rupert A., Jörn-Alexander Heye, and Clemens Woywod. "Future Development of Quantum Computing and Its Relevance to NATO." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 20, no. 2 (2021): 89-109.

Introduction

Already in our era of “classical computing,” maintaining cybersecurity is an enormous challenge.

20.2.08_quantum.pdf — Downloaded 446 times

Social Media – Hate Speech – Hate Crime

Vilím, Lukáš. "Social Media – Hate Speech – Hate Crime." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 20, no. 2 (2021): 57-73.

Introduction

Nowadays, it is not uncommon for social media to include manifestations of hatred, misleading information, and elements of extremism or terrorism. We already observe that political and religious extremist groups use social media and networks to promote their ideology, recruit new members, demonstrate their power, and shock society with videos of wars as something commonplace and unavoidable. Society is already able to act against such use of social networks and its negative consequences. There are many ways to do so.

20.2.06_social_networks_hate_speech.pdf — Downloaded 379 times

Disinformation: Policy Responses to Building Citizen Resiliency

Miyamoto, Inez. "Disinformation: Policy Responses to Building Citizen Resiliency." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 20, no. 2 (2021): 47-55.

Introduction

With the growth of social media, there is a flood of unregulated content available on the Internet. Gone are socially-responsible publishers, editors, and subject matter experts to evaluate information that was available with traditional media.[1] Instead, citizens are left to decide what is fake or real, while maligned actors leverage this opportunity, along with the openness of democracies, to influence societies with disinformation.

20.2.05_disinformation.pdf — Downloaded 444 times

Cyber Skills Gaps – A Systematic Review of the Academic Literature

Ruoslahti, Harri, Janel Coburn, Amir Trent, and Ilkka Tikanmäki. "Cyber Skills Gaps – A Systematic Review of the Academic Literature." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 20, no. 2 (2021): 33-45.

Introduction

The use of computers and other digital technology is a daily reality for over half of the global population and substantially more in modern European society. Of the roughly 7.8 billion people inhabiting the planet as of March 2020,[1] an estimated 59 % are internet users and, as of 2019, 49 % of those users have computers in their homes.[2]

20.2.04_cyber_skills_gaps.pdf — Downloaded 443 times

Trusting ICT Providers – Can Corporate Cyber Confidence-Building Measures Help?

Klaus, Matthias. "Trusting ICT Providers – Can Corporate Cyber Confidence-Building Measures Help?" Connections: The Quarterly Journal 20, no. 2 (2021): 21-31.

Nations need to trust or ban a vendor from building their Information and Communication Technology (ICT) infrastructure and services. In a world where private companies almost exclusively wield both the technical expertise and means to develop, operate, and maintain the ICT structure, nations increasingly depend on the private sector.

20.2.03_ict_providers_csbm.pdf — Downloaded 376 times

Evolution of Police Roles in Combatting Cybercrime in the Czech Republic, 2015-2020

Vilím, Lukáš. "Evolution of Police Roles in Combatting Cybercrime in the Czech Republic, 2015-2020." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 20, no. 2 (2021): 15-20.

A significant milestone in the fight against cybercrime in the Czech Republic is the Government’s approval on July 10, 2017, of the “Concept for the Development of the Cybercrime Investigation Capabilities of the Police of the Czech Republic” (hereinafter the Concept) under number 502.

20.2.02_cybercrime_czechia.pdf — Downloaded 338 times

Sovereign or Global Internet? Russia and China Press for Cybercrime Treaty

Costigan, Sean S.. "Sovereign or Global Internet? Russia and China Press for Cybercrime Treaty." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 20, no. 2 (2021): 9-13.

Global unrest is fast becoming the norm in cyberspace, where cybercriminals operate with relative impunity, and novel technologies allow nation-states to sharpen their practice of influence operations. There is a near-constant rate of hacks against computers – by one recent count every 39 seconds on average for devices connected to the Internet.[1] If cybercrime is not tackled, at risk is nothing less than trust in the government’s ability to deliver on the promise of security.

Countering Crime, Hate Speech, and Disinformation in Cyberspace

Costigan, Sean S., and Todor Tagarev. "Countering Crime, Hate Speech, and Disinformation in Cyberspace." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 20, no. 2 (2021): 5-8.

Today, cyberspace is deeply challenged by a variety of largely political concerns. This new humanizing of cyberspace may seem fitting to some who fretted for years over a relative lack of high-level political interest in the world’s only new “domain.” With cyber now being the topic of the day, it is easy to forget that, however notional, cyber was considered too technical to be worthy of elite policy attention until suddenly it was red hot and everywhere.

20.2.00_cybercrime_disinformation_.pdf — Downloaded 416 times

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